Changeset fbd6c0f in rtems


Ignore:
Timestamp:
02/28/08 18:53:49 (15 years ago)
Author:
Joel Sherrill <joel.sherrill@…>
Branches:
4.10, 4.11, 4.9, 5, master
Children:
c2153cf
Parents:
265d499a
Message:

2008-02-28 Joel Sherrill <joel.sherrill@…>

  • shell/file.t, shell/network.t: Document more commands and provide more examples.
Location:
doc
Files:
3 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • doc/ChangeLog

    r265d499a rfbd6c0f  
     12008-02-28      Joel Sherrill <joel.sherrill@oarcorp.com>
     2
     3        * shell/file.t, shell/network.t: Document more commands and provide
     4        more examples.
     5
    162008-02-27      Joel Sherrill <joel.sherrill@oarcorp.com>
    27
  • doc/shell/file.t

    r265d499a rfbd6c0f  
    238238@subheading EXAMPLES:
    239239
    240 The following is an example of how to use @code{cp}:
    241 
    242 @example
    243 EXAMPLE_TBD
     240The following is an example of how to use @code{cp} to
     241copy a file to a new name in the current directory:
     242
     243@example
     244SHLL [/] # cat joel
     245cat: joel: No such file or directory
     246SHLL [/] # cp etc/passwd joel
     247SHLL [/] # cat joel
     248root:*:0:0:root::/:/bin/sh
     249rtems:*:1:1:RTEMS Application::/:/bin/sh
     250tty:!:2:2:tty owner::/:/bin/false
     251SHLL [/] # ls
     252drwxr-xr-x   1   root   root         536 Jan 01 00:00 dev/
     253drwxr-xr-x   1   root   root        1072 Jan 01 00:00 etc/
     254-rw-r--r--   1   root   root         102 Jan 01 00:00 joel
     2553 files 1710 bytes occupied
     256@end example
     257
     258The following is an example of how to use @code{cp} to
     259copy one or more files to a destination directory and
     260use the same @code{basename} in the destination directory:
     261
     262@example
     263SHLL [/] # mkdir tmp
     264SHLL [/] # ls tmp         
     2650 files 0 bytes occupied
     266SHLL [/] # cp /etc/passwd tmp
     267SHLL [/] # ls /tmp
     268-rw-r--r--   1   root   root         102 Jan 01 00:01 passwd
     2691 files 102 bytes occupied
     270SHLL [/] # cp /etc/passwd /etc/group /tmp
     271SHLL [/] # ls /tmp
     272-rw-r--r--   1   root   root         102 Jan 01 00:01 passwd
     273-rw-r--r--   1   root   root          42 Jan 01 00:01 group
     2742 files 144 bytes occupied
     275SHLL [/] #
    244276@end example
    245277
     
    281313@subheading ORIGIN:
    282314
    283 The implementation and documentation for this command are from
    284 NetBSD 4.0.
     315The implementation and portions of the documentation for this
     316command are from NetBSD 4.0.
    285317
    286318@c
     
    709741@subheading EXAMPLES:
    710742
    711 The following is an example of how to use @code{chroot}:
    712 
    713 @example
    714 EXAMPLE_TBD
     743The following is an example of how to use @code{chroot}
     744and the impact it has on the environment for subsequent
     745command invocations:
     746
     747@example
     748SHLL [/] $ cat passwd
     749cat: passwd: No such file or directory
     750SHLL [/] $ chroot etc
     751SHLL [/] $ cat passwd
     752root:*:0:0:root::/:/bin/sh
     753rtems:*:1:1:RTEMS Application::/:/bin/sh
     754tty:!:2:2:tty owner::/:/bin/false
     755SHLL [/] $ cat /etc/passwd
     756cat: /etc/passwd: No such file or directory
    715757@end example
    716758
     
    11501192@subheading DESCRIPTION:
    11511193
    1152 This command XXX
    1153 
    1154 @subheading EXIT STATUS:
    1155 
    1156 This command returns 0 on success and non-zero if an error is encountered.
    1157 
    1158 @subheading NOTES:
    1159 
    1160 TBD
     1194This command unmounts the device at the specified @code{path}.
     1195
     1196@subheading EXIT STATUS:
     1197
     1198This command returns 0 on success and non-zero if an error is encountered.
     1199
     1200@subheading NOTES:
     1201
     1202TBD - Surely there must be some warnings to go here.
    11611203
    11621204@subheading EXAMPLES:
     
    13051347
    13061348@example
    1307 EXAMPLE_TBD
     1349SHLL [/] $ dir
     1350drwxr-xr-x   1   root   root         536 Jan 01 00:00 dev/
     1351drwxr-xr-x   1   root   root        1072 Jan 01 00:00 etc/
     13522 files 1608 bytes occupied
     1353SHLL [/] $ dir etc
     1354-rw-r--r--   1   root   root         102 Jan 01 00:00 passwd
     1355-rw-r--r--   1   root   root          42 Jan 01 00:00 group
     1356-rw-r--r--   1   root   root          30 Jan 01 00:00 issue
     1357-rw-r--r--   1   root   root          28 Jan 01 00:00 issue.net
     13584 files 202 bytes occupied
    13081359@end example
    13091360
     
    13761427
    13771428@example
    1378 EXAMPLE_TBD
     1429SHLL [/] $ cd etc
     1430SHLL [/etc] $ cd /
     1431SHLL [/] $ cd /etc
     1432SHLL [/etc] $ pwd
     1433/etc
     1434SHLL [/etc] $ cd /
     1435SHLL [/] $ pwd
     1436/
     1437SHLL [/] $ cd etc
     1438SHLL [/etc] $ cd ..
     1439SHLL [/] $ pwd
     1440/
    13791441@end example
    13801442
  • doc/shell/network.t

    r265d499a rfbd6c0f  
    3838
    3939@example
    40 netstats [-Aimfpcutv]
     40netstats [-Aimfpcut]
    4141@end example
    4242
    4343@subheading DESCRIPTION:
    4444
    45 This command XXX
     45This command is used to display various types of network statistics.  The
     46information displayed can be specified using command line arguments in
     47various combinations.  The arguments are interpreted as follows:
     48
     49@table @b
     50@item -A
     51print All statistics
     52
     53@item -i
     54print Inet Routes
     55
     56@item -m
     57print MBUF Statistics
     58
     59@item -f
     60print IF Statistics
     61
     62@item -p
     63print IP Statistics
     64
     65@item -c
     66print ICMP Statistics
     67
     68@item -u
     69print UDP Statistics
     70
     71@item -t
     72print TCP Statistics
     73
     74@end table
    4675
    4776@subheading EXIT STATUS:
     
    5786The following is an example of how to use @code{netstats}:
    5887
    59 @example
    60 EXAMPLE_TBD
    61 @end example
     88The following is an example of using the @code{netstats}
     89command to print the IP routing table:
     90
     91@smallexample
     92[/] $ netstats -i
     93Destination     Gateway/Mask/Hw    Flags     Refs     Use Expire Interface
     94default         192.168.1.14       UGS         0        0      0 eth1
     95192.168.1.0     255.255.255.0      U           0        0      1 eth1
     96192.168.1.14    00:A0:C8:1C:EE:28  UHL         1        0   1219 eth1
     97192.168.1.51    00:1D:7E:0C:D0:7C  UHL         0      840   1202 eth1
     98192.168.1.151   00:1C:23:B2:0F:BB  UHL         1       23   1219 eth1
     99@end smallexample
     100
     101The following is an example of using the @code{netstats}
     102command to print the MBUF statistics:
     103
     104@smallexample
     105[/] $ netstats -m
     106************ MBUF STATISTICS ************
     107mbufs:2048    clusters: 128    free:  63
     108drops:   0       waits:   0  drains:   0
     109      free:1967          data:79          header:2           socket:0       
     110       pcb:0           rtable:0           htable:0           atable:0       
     111    soname:0           soopts:0           ftable:0           rights:0       
     112    ifaddr:0          control:0          oobdata:0       
     113@end smallexample
     114
     115The following is an example of using the @code{netstats}
     116command to print the print the interface statistics:
     117
     118@smallexample
     119[/] $ netstats -f
     120************ INTERFACE STATISTICS ************
     121***** eth1 *****
     122Ethernet Address: 00:04:9F:00:5B:21
     123Address:192.168.1.244   Broadcast Address:192.168.1.255   Net mask:255.255.255.0   
     124Flags: Up Broadcast Running Active Multicast
     125Send queue limit:50   length:1    Dropped:0       
     126      Rx Interrupts:889            Not First:0               Not Last:0       
     127              Giant:0              Non-octet:0       
     128            Bad CRC:0                Overrun:0              Collision:0       
     129      Tx Interrupts:867             Deferred:0         Late Collision:0       
     130   Retransmit Limit:0               Underrun:0             Misaligned:0       
     131@end smallexample
     132
     133The following is an example of using the @code{netstats}
     134command to print the print IP statistics:
     135
     136@smallexample
     137[/] $ netstats -p
     138************ IP Statistics ************
     139             total packets received         894
     140  packets rcvd for unreachable dest          13
     141 datagrams delivered to upper level         881
     142    total ip packets generated here         871
     143
     144@end smallexample
     145
     146The following is an example of using the @code{netstats}
     147command to print the ICMP statistics:
     148
     149@smallexample
     150[/] $ netstats -c
     151************ ICMP Statistics ************
     152                        Type 0 sent         843
     153                number of responses         843
     154                    Type 8 received         843
     155
     156@end smallexample
     157
     158The following is an example of using the @code{netstats}
     159command to print the UDP statistics:
     160
     161@smallexample
     162[/] $ netstats -u
     163************ UDP Statistics ************
     164
     165@end smallexample
     166
     167The following is an example of using the @code{netstats}
     168command to print the TCP statistics:
     169
     170@smallexample
     171[/] $ netstats -t
     172************ TCP Statistics ************
     173               connections accepted           1
     174            connections established           1
     175     segs where we tried to get rtt          34
     176                 times we succeeded          35
     177                  delayed acks sent           2
     178                 total packets sent          37
     179                  data packets sent          35
     180                    data bytes sent        2618
     181              ack-only packets sent           2
     182             total packets received          47
     183       packets received in sequence          12
     184         bytes received in sequence         307
     185                   rcvd ack packets          35
     186           bytes acked by rcvd acks        2590
     187      times hdr predict ok for acks          27
     188 times hdr predict ok for data pkts          10
     189@end smallexample
    62190
    63191@subheading CONFIGURATION:
     
    108236@example
    109237ifconfig
     238ifconfig interface
     239ifconfig interface [up|down]
     240ifconfig interface [netmask|pointtopoint|broadcast] IP
     241
    110242@end example
    111243
    112244@subheading DESCRIPTION:
    113245
    114 This command XXX
     246This command may be used to display information about the
     247network interfaces in the system or configure them.
    115248
    116249@subheading EXIT STATUS:
     
    120253@subheading NOTES:
    121254
    122 NONE
     255Just like its counterpart on GNU/Linux and BSD systems, this command
     256is complicated.  More example usages would be a welcome submission.
    123257
    124258@subheading EXAMPLES:
     
    126260The following is an example of how to use @code{ifconfig}:
    127261
    128 @example
    129 EXAMPLE_TBD
    130 @end example
     262@smallexample
     263 ************ INTERFACE STATISTICS ************
     264***** eth1 *****
     265Ethernet Address: 00:04:9F:00:5B:21
     266Address:192.168.1.244   Broadcast Address:192.168.1.255   Net mask:255.255.255.0   
     267Flags: Up Broadcast Running Active Multicast
     268Send queue limit:50   length:1    Dropped:0       
     269      Rx Interrupts:5391           Not First:0               Not Last:0       
     270              Giant:0              Non-octet:0       
     271            Bad CRC:0                Overrun:0              Collision:0       
     272      Tx Interrupts:5256            Deferred:0         Late Collision:0       
     273   Retransmit Limit:0               Underrun:0             Misaligned:0     
     274@end smallexample
    131275
    132276@subheading CONFIGURATION:
     
    176320
    177321@example
    178 route [subcommand]
     322route [subcommand] [args]
    179323@end example
    180324
    181325@subheading DESCRIPTION:
    182326
    183 This command XXX
     327This command is used to display and manipulate the routing table.
     328When invoked with no arguments, the current routing information is
     329displayed.  When invoked with the subcommands @code{add} or @code{del},
     330then additional arguments must be provided to describe the route.
     331
     332Command templates include the following:
     333
     334@smallexample
     335route [add|del] -net IP_ADDRESS gw GATEWAY_ADDRESS [netmask MASK]
     336route [add|del] -host IP_ADDRESS gw GATEWAY_ADDRES [netmask MASK]
     337@end smallexample
     338
     339When not provided the netmask defaults to @code{255.255.255.0}
    184340
    185341@subheading EXIT STATUS:
     
    189345@subheading NOTES:
    190346
    191 NONE
     347Just like its counterpart on GNU/Linux and BSD systems, this command
     348is complicated.  More example usages would be a welcome submission.
    192349
    193350@subheading EXAMPLES:
    194351
    195 The following is an example of how to use @code{route}:
    196 
    197 @example
    198 EXAMPLE_TBD
    199 @end example
     352The following is an example of how to use @code{route} to display,
     353add, and delete a new route:
     354
     355@smallexample
     356[/] $ route
     357Destination     Gateway/Mask/Hw    Flags     Refs     Use Expire Interface
     358default         192.168.1.14       UGS         0        0      0 eth1
     359192.168.1.0     255.255.255.0      U           0        0      1 eth1
     360192.168.1.14    00:A0:C8:1C:EE:28  UHL         1        0   1444 eth1
     361192.168.1.51    00:1D:7E:0C:D0:7C  UHL         0    10844   1202 eth1
     362192.168.1.151   00:1C:23:B2:0F:BB  UHL         2       37   1399 eth1
     363[/] $  route add -net 192.168.3.0 gw 192.168.1.14
     364[/] $ route
     365Destination     Gateway/Mask/Hw    Flags     Refs     Use Expire Interface
     366default         192.168.1.14       UGS         0        0      0 eth1
     367192.168.1.0     255.255.255.0      U           0        0      1 eth1
     368192.168.1.14    00:A0:C8:1C:EE:28  UHL         2        0   1498 eth1
     369192.168.1.51    00:1D:7E:0C:D0:7C  UHL         0    14937   1202 eth1
     370192.168.1.151   00:1C:23:B2:0F:BB  UHL         2       96   1399 eth1
     371192.168.3.0     192.168.1.14       UGS         0        0      0 eth1
     372[/] $ route del -net 192.168.3.0 gw 192.168.1.14
     373[/] $ route
     374Destination     Gateway/Mask/Hw    Flags     Refs     Use Expire Interface
     375default         192.168.1.14       UGS         0        0      0 eth1
     376192.168.1.0     255.255.255.0      U           0        0      1 eth1
     377192.168.1.14    00:A0:C8:1C:EE:28  UHL         1        0   1498 eth1
     378192.168.1.51    00:1D:7E:0C:D0:7C  UHL         0    15945   1202 eth1
     379192.168.1.151   00:1C:23:B2:0F:BB  UHL         2      117   1399 eth1
     380@end smallexample
    200381
    201382@subheading CONFIGURATION:
Note: See TracChangeset for help on using the changeset viewer.