Changeset d389819 in rtems-docs for networking


Ignore:
Timestamp:
01/18/16 05:37:40 (7 years ago)
Author:
Amar Takhar <amar@…>
Branches:
4.11, 5, am, master
Children:
f916fca
Parents:
11e1a6f
git-author:
Amar Takhar <amar@…> (01/18/16 05:37:40)
git-committer:
Amar Takhar <verm@…> (05/03/16 00:51:24)
Message:

Convert all Unicode to ASCII(128)

Location:
networking
Files:
8 edited

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  • networking/dec_21140.rst

    r11e1a6f rd389819  
    4747The board we have chosen for our PC386 implementation is a D-Link DFE-500TX.
    4848This is a dual-speed 10/100Mbps Ethernet PCI adapter with a DEC21140AF chip.
    49 Like other PCI devices, this board has a PCI device’s header containing some
     49Like other PCI devices, this board has a PCI device's header containing some
    5050required configuration registers, as shown in the PCI Register Figure.
    5151By reading
     
    133133
    134134This thread is event driven. Each time a DEC PCI board interrupt occurs, the
    135 handler checks if this is a receive interrupt and send an event “reception”
     135handler checks if this is a receive interrupt and send an event "reception"
    136136to the receiver thread which looks into the entire buffer descriptors ring the
    137137ones that contain a valid incoming frame (bit OWN=0 means descriptor belongs
  • networking/index.rst

    r11e1a6f rd389819  
    22RTEMS Network Supplement
    33========================
    4 COPYRIGHT © 1988 - 2015.
     4COPYRIGHT (c) 1988 - 2015.
    55
    66On-Line Applications Research Corporation (OAR).
  • networking/network_servers.rst

    r11e1a6f rd389819  
    77The RTEMS FTPD is a complete file transfer protocol (FTP) daemon
    88which can store, retrieve, and manipulate files on the local
    9 filesystem.  In addition, the RTEMS FTPD provides “hooks”
     9filesystem.  In addition, the RTEMS FTPD provides "hooks"
    1010which are actions performed on received data.  Hooks are useful
    1111in situations where a destination file is not necessarily
  • networking/network_task_structure.rst

    r11e1a6f rd389819  
    2424aging and removing routing table entries.
    2525
    26 The ‘Network code’ contains routines which may run in the context of
     26The 'Network code' contains routines which may run in the context of
    2727the user application tasks, the interface receive task or the network task.
    2828A network semaphore ensures that
  • networking/networking_driver.rst

    r11e1a6f rd389819  
    77This chapter is intended to provide an introduction to the
    88procedure for writing RTEMS network device drivers.
    9 The example code is taken from the ‘Generic 68360’ network device
     9The example code is taken from the 'Generic 68360' network device
    1010driver.  The source code for this driver is located in the``c/src/lib/libbsp/m68k/gen68360/network`` directory in the RTEMS
    1111source code distribution.  Having a copy of this driver at
     
    1616
    1717Before starting to write the network driver become completely
    18 familiar with the programmer’s view of the device.
     18familiar with the programmer's view of the device.
    1919The following points list some of the details of the
    2020device that must be understood before a driver can be written.
     
    7171execute only when they hold the network semaphore (``rtems_bsdnet_semaphore``).
    7272The transmit and receive tasks must abide by this protocol.  Be very
    73 careful to avoid ‘deadly embraces’ with the other network tasks.
     73careful to avoid 'deadly embraces' with the other network tasks.
    7474A number of routines are provided to make it easier for the network
    7575driver code to conform to the network task scheduling conventions.
     
    161161``ifp->if_unit``
    162162    The device number.  The network stack uses this number and the
    163     device name for device name lookups.  For example, if``ifp->if_name`` is ‘``scc``’ and ``ifp->if_unit`` is ‘``1``’,
    164     the full device name would be ‘``scc1``’.  The unit number should be
    165     obtained from the ‘name’ entry in the configuration structure.
     163    device name for device name lookups.  For example, if``ifp->if_name`` is '``scc``' and ``ifp->if_unit`` is '``1``',
     164    the full device name would be '``scc1``'.  The unit number should be
     165    obtained from the 'name' entry in the configuration structure.
    166166
    167167``ifp->if_mtu``
     
    212212calling ``if_attach``.  Ethernet devices should then
    213213call ``ether_ifattach``.  Both functions take a pointer to the
    214 device’s ``ifnet`` structure as their only argument.
     214device's ``ifnet`` structure as their only argument.
    215215
    216216The attach function should return a non-zero value to indicate that
     
    222222This function is called each time the network stack wants to start the
    223223transmitter.  This occures whenever the network stack adds a packet
    224 to a device’s send queue and the ``IFF_OACTIVE`` bit in the
    225 device’s ``if_flags`` is not set.
     224to a device's send queue and the ``IFF_OACTIVE`` bit in the
     225device's ``if_flags`` is not set.
    226226
    227227For many devices this function need only set the ``IFF_OACTIVE`` bit in the``if_flags`` and send an event to the transmit task
  • networking/preface.rst

    r11e1a6f rd389819  
    1212to understand Ethernet:
    1313
    14 - *Charles Spurgeon’s Ethernet Web Site*
     14- *Charles Spurgeon's Ethernet Web Site*
    1515  "This site provides extensive information about Ethernet
    1616  (IEEE 802.3) local area network (LAN) technology. Including
  • networking/testing_the_driver.rst

    r11e1a6f rd389819  
    1212
    1313- An Ethernet network analyzer or a workstation with an
    14   ‘Ethernet snoop’ program such as ``ethersnoop`` or``tcpdump``.
     14  'Ethernet snoop' program such as ``ethersnoop`` or``tcpdump``.
    1515
    1616- A workstation.
     
    4040- mbuf activity
    4141  There are commented out calls to ``printf`` in the file``sys/mbuf.h`` in the network stack code.  Uncommenting
    42   these lines results in output when mbuf’s are allocated
     42  these lines results in output when mbuf's are allocated
    4343  and freed.  This is very useful for finding memory leaks.
    4444
     
    9292  For a quick reference to the flags, see the table below:
    9393
    94   ‘``U``’
     94  '``U``'
    9595      Up: The route is active.
    9696
    97   ‘``H``’
     97  '``H``'
    9898      Host: The route destination is a single host.
    9999
    100   ‘``G``’
     100  '``G``'
    101101      Gateway: Send anything for this destination on to this remote system, which
    102102      will figure out from there where to send it.
    103103
    104   ‘``S``’
     104  '``S``'
    105105      Static: This route was configured manually, not automatically generated by the
    106106      system.
    107107
    108   ‘``C``’
     108  '``C``'
    109109      Clone: Generates a new route based upon this route for machines we connect
    110110      to. This type of route is normally used for local networks.
    111111
    112   ‘``W``’
     112  '``W``'
    113113      WasCloned: Indicated a route that was auto-configured based upon a local area
    114114      network (Clone) route.
    115115
    116   ‘``L``’
     116  '``L``'
    117117      Link: Route involves references to Ethernet hardware.
    118118
     
    183183  Verify that the program continues to run once the driver has been attached.
    184184
    185 - Issue a ‘``u``’ command to send UDP
    186   packets to the ‘discard’ port.
     185- Issue a '``u``' command to send UDP
     186  packets to the 'discard' port.
    187187  Verify that the packets appear on the network.
    188188
    189 - Issue a ‘``s``’ command to print the network and driver statistics.
     189- Issue a '``s``' command to print the network and driver statistics.
    190190
    191191- On a workstation, add a static route to the target system.
    192192
    193 - On that same workstation try to ‘ping’ the target system.
     193- On that same workstation try to 'ping' the target system.
    194194  Verify that the ICMP echo request and reply packets appear on the net.
    195195
     
    197197  Modify ``networkconfig.h`` to attach the driver
    198198  with reception of broadcast packets enabled.
    199   Try to ‘ping’ the target system again.
     199  Try to 'ping' the target system again.
    200200  Verify that ARP request/reply and ICMP echo request/reply packets appear
    201201  on the net.
    202202
    203 - Issue a ‘``t``’ command to send TCP
    204   packets to the ‘discard’ port.
     203- Issue a '``t``' command to send TCP
     204  packets to the 'discard' port.
    205205  Verify that the packets appear on the network.
    206206
    207 - Issue a ‘``s``’ command to print the network and driver statistics.
     207- Issue a '``s``' command to print the network and driver statistics.
    208208
    209209- Verify that you can telnet to ports 24742
     
    233233  a smaller value, say 514.
    234234
    235 - ‘Ping’ the driver from another workstation and verify
     235- 'Ping' the driver from another workstation and verify
    236236  that frames larger than 514 bytes are correctly rejected.
    237237
     
    249249  still telnet to both the ports.
    250250
    251 - Display the driver statistics (Console ‘``s``’ command or telnet
    252   ‘control-G’ character) and verify that:
     251- Display the driver statistics (Console '``s``' command or telnet
     252  'control-G' character) and verify that:
    253253
    254254  # The number of transmit interrupts is non-zero.
     
    263263- Run the ``netdemo`` program.
    264264
    265 - Issue a ‘``u``’ console command to make the target machine transmit
     265- Issue a '``u``' console command to make the target machine transmit
    266266  a bunch of UDP packets.
    267267
     
    278278
    279279Run the ``ttcp`` network benchmark program.
    280 Transfer large amounts of data (100’s of megabytes) to and from the target
     280Transfer large amounts of data (100's of megabytes) to and from the target
    281281system.
    282282
  • networking/using_networking_rtems_app.rst

    r11e1a6f rd389819  
    127127    standard files created with the information return by the BOOTP/DHCP
    128128    protocol. The IP address is added to :file:`/etc/hosts` with the host
    129     name and domain returned. If no host name or domain is returned``me.mydomain`` is used. The BOOTP/DHCP server’s address is also
     129    name and domain returned. If no host name or domain is returned``me.mydomain`` is used. The BOOTP/DHCP server's address is also
    130130    added to :file:`/etc/hosts`. The domain name server listed in the
    131131    BOOTP/DHCP information are added to :file:`/etc/resolv.conf`. A``search`` record is also added if a domain is returned. The files
     
    163163``char \*gateway``
    164164    The Internet host number of the network gateway machine,
    165     specified in ’dotted decimal’ (``129.128.4.1``) form.
     165    specified in 'dotted decimal' (``129.128.4.1``) form.
    166166
    167167``char \*log_host``
     
    280280``char \*ip_address``
    281281    The Internet address of the device,
    282     specified in ‘dotted decimal’ (``129.128.4.2``) form, or ``NULL``
     282    specified in 'dotted decimal' (``129.128.4.2``) form, or ``NULL``
    283283    if the device configuration information is being obtained from a
    284284    BOOTP/DHCP server.
     
    286286``char \*ip_netmask``
    287287    The Internet inetwork mask of the device,
    288     specified in ‘dotted decimal’ (``255.255.255.0``) form, or ``NULL``
     288    specified in 'dotted decimal' (``255.255.255.0``) form, or ``NULL``
    289289    if the device configuration information is being obtained from a
    290290    BOOTP/DHCP server.
     
    497497For sending, when the socket is connected and the free space becomes at
    498498or above the "low water mark" for the send buffer (default 4096 bytes)
    499 you will receive a writable callback. You don’t get continuous callbacks
    500 if you don’t write anything. Using a non-blocking write socket, you can
     499you will receive a writable callback. You don't get continuous callbacks
     500if you don't write anything. Using a non-blocking write socket, you can
    501501then call write until it returns a value less than the amount of data
    502502requested to be sent or it produces error EWOULDBLOCK (indicating buffer
     
    838838If the interval argument is greater than 0, the routine also starts an
    839839RTEMS task at the specified priority and polls the NTP server every
    840 â€˜interval’ seconds.  NOTE: This mode of operation has not yet been
     840'interval' seconds.  NOTE: This mode of operation has not yet been
    841841implemented.
    842842
     
    844844returns 0.  If an error occurs a message is printed and the routine returns -1
    845845with an error code in errno.
    846 There is no timeout – if there is no response from an NTP server the
     846There is no timeout - if there is no response from an NTP server the
    847847routine will wait forever.
    848848
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