Changeset 9b53679 in rtems-docs for develenv/utilities.rst


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Oct 27, 2016, 11:12:50 PM (4 years ago)
Author:
Chris Johns <chrisj@…>
Branches:
4.11, 5, am, master
Children:
8e59c99
Parents:
be428d1
git-author:
Chris Johns <chrisj@…> (10/27/16 23:12:50)
git-committer:
Chris Johns <chrisj@…> (10/27/16 23:13:03)
Message:

Fix develenv. Needs more fixes.

File:
1 edited

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  • develenv/utilities.rst

    rbe428d1 r9b53679  
    44########################
    55
    6 This section describes the additional commands
    7 available within the *RTEMS Development Environment*.  Although
    8 some of these commands are of general use, most are included to
    9 provide some capability necessary to perform a required function
    10 in the development of the RTEMS executive, one of its support
     6This section describes the additional commands available within the *RTEMS
     7Development Environment*.  Although some of these commands are of general use,
     8most are included to provide some capability necessary to perform a required
     9function in the development of the RTEMS executive, one of its support
    1110components, or an RTEMS based application.
    1211
    13 Some of the commands are implemented as C programs.
    14 However, most commands are implemented as Bourne shell scripts.
    15 Even if the current user has selected a different shell, the
    16 scripts will automatically invoke the Bourne shell during their
    17 execution lifetime.
     12Some of the commands are implemented as C programs.  However, most commands are
     13implemented as Bourne shell scripts.  Even if the current user has selected a
     14different shell, the scripts will automatically invoke the Bourne shell during
     15their execution lifetime.
    1816
    19 The commands are presented in UNIX manual page style
    20 for compatibility and convenience.  A standard set of paragraph
    21 headers were used for all of the command descriptions.  If a
    22 section contained no data, the paragraph header was omitted to
    23 conserve space.  Each of the permissible paragraph headers and
    24 their contents are described below:
     17The commands are presented in UNIX manual page style for compatibility and
     18convenience.  A standard set of paragraph headers were used for all of the
     19command descriptions.  If a section contained no data, the paragraph header was
     20omitted to conserve space.  Each of the permissible paragraph headers and their
     21contents are described below:
    2522
    2623``SYNOPSIS``
     
    4845    lists any relevant commands which can be consulted
    4946
    50 Most environment variables referenced by the commands
    51 are defined for the RTEMS Development Environment during the
    52 login procedure.  During login, the user selects a default RTEMS
    53 environment through the use of the Modules package.  This tool
    54 effectively sets the environment variables to provide a
    55 consistent development environment for a specific user.
    56 Additional environment variables within the RTEMS environment
    57 were set by the system administrator during installation.  When
    58 specifying paths, a command description makes use of these
     47Most environment variables referenced by the commands are defined for the RTEMS
     48Development Environment during the login procedure.  During login, the user
     49selects a default RTEMS environment through the use of the Modules package.
     50This tool effectively sets the environment variables to provide a consistent
     51development environment for a specific user.  Additional environment variables
     52within the RTEMS environment were set by the system administrator during
     53installation.  When specifying paths, a command description makes use of these
    5954environment variables.
    6055
    61 When referencing other commands in the SEE ALSO
    62 paragraph, the following notation is used:   command(code).
    63 Where command is the name of a related command, and code is a
    64 section number.  Valid section numbers are as follows:
     56When referencing other commands in the SEE ALSO paragraph, the following
     57notation is used: command(code).  Where command is the name of a related
     58command, and code is a section number.  Valid section numbers are as follows:
    6559
    6660``1``
     
    7367    a manual page from this document, the RTEMS Development Environment Guide
    7468
    75 For example, ls(1) means see the standard ls command
    76 in section 1 of the UNIX documentation.  gcc020(1G) means see
    77 the description of gcc020 in section 1 of the GNU documentation.
    78 
    79 .. COMMENT: packhex
     69For example, ``ls(1)`` means see the standard ls command in section 1 of the
     70UNIX documentation.  gcc020(1G) means see the description of gcc020 in section
     711 of the GNU documentation.
    8072
    8173packhex - Compress Hexadecimal File
     
    8476**SYNOPSIS**
    8577
    86 .. code:: c
     78.. code-block:: c
    8779
    8880    packhex <source >destination
     
    9082**DESCRIPTION**
    9183
    92 packhex accepts Intel Hexadecimal or Motorola Srecord
    93 on its standard input and attempts to pack as many contiguous
    94 bytes as possible into a single hexadecimal record.  Many
    95 programs output hexadecimal records which are less than 80 bytes
    96 long (for human viewing).  The overhead required by each
    97 unnecessary record is significant and packhex can often reduce
    98 the size of the download image by 20%.  packhex attempts to
    99 output records which are as long as the hexadecimal format
     84packhex accepts Intel Hexadecimal or Motorola Srecord on its standard input and
     85attempts to pack as many contiguous bytes as possible into a single hexadecimal
     86record.  Many programs output hexadecimal records which are less than 80 bytes
     87long (for human viewing).  The overhead required by each unnecessary record is
     88significant and packhex can often reduce the size of the download image by 20%.
     89packhex attempts to output records which are as long as the hexadecimal format
    10090allows.
    10191
     
    10696**EXAMPLES**
    10797
    108 Assume the current directory contains the Motorola
    109 Srecord file download.sr. Then executing the command:
    110 .. code:: c
     98Assume the current directory contains the Motorola Srecord file
     99download.sr. Then executing the command:
     100
     101.. code-block:: c
    111102
    112103    packhex <download.sr >packed.sr
    113104
    114 will generate the file packed.sr which is usually
    115 smaller than download.sr.
     105will generate the file packed.sr which is usually smaller than download.sr.
    116106
    117107**CREDITS**
    118108
    119 The source for packhex first appeared in the May 1993
    120 issue of Embedded Systems magazine.  The code was downloaded
    121 from their BBS.  Unfortunately, the author's name was not
    122 provided in the listing.
    123 
    124 .. COMMENT: unhex
     109The source for packhex first appeared in the May 1993 issue of Embedded Systems
     110magazine.  The code was downloaded from their BBS.  Unfortunately, the author's
     111name was not provided in the listing.
    125112
    126113unhex - Convert Hexadecimal File into Binary Equivalent
     
    129116**SYNOPSIS**
    130117
    131 .. code:: c
     118.. code-block:: c
    132119
    133     unhex \[-valF] \[-o file] \[file \[file ...] ]
     120    unhex [-valF] [-o file] [file [file ...] ]
    134121
    135122**DESCRIPTION**
    136123
    137 unhex accepts Intel Hexadecimal, Motorola Srecord, or
    138 TI 'B' records and converts them to their binary equivalent.
    139 The output may sent to standout or may be placed in a specified
    140 file with the -o option.  The designated output file may not be
    141 an input file.  Multiple input files may be specified with their
    142 outputs logically concatenated into the output file.
     124unhex accepts Intel Hexadecimal, Motorola Srecord, or TI 'B' records and
     125converts them to their binary equivalent.  The output may sent to standout or
     126may be placed in a specified file with the -o option.  The designated output
     127file may not be an input file.  Multiple input files may be specified with
     128their outputs logically concatenated into the output file.
    143129
    144130**OPTIONS**
     
    150136
    151137``a base``
    152     First byte of output corresponds with base
    153     address
     138    First byte of output corresponds with base address
    154139
    155140``l``
     
    164149**EXAMPLES**
    165150
    166 The following command will create a binary equivalent
    167 file for the two Motorola S record files in the specified output
    168 file binary.bin:
    169 .. code:: c
     151The following command will create a binary equivalent file for the two Motorola
     152S record files in the specified output file binary.bin:
     153
     154.. code-block:: c
    170155
    171156    unhex -o binary.bin downloadA.sr downloadB.sr
    172 
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